Post(s) tagged with "center for sex and culture"

Artist Interview: Felicita Norris — SOMArts ⇢

Check out this great interview with  DYDW3 artist Felicita Norris —she won the Murphy & Cadogan award and her gorgeous paintings are up at SOMArts right now as well as in our show at CSC.

Celebrate the release of The Ring of Fire Anthology at CSC with author ET Russian, Nomy Lamm, Lyric Seal, and BED DEATH!!!
—————
Left Bank Books says:

The Ring of Fire Anthology is a collection of the zine from the late 1990s by ET Russian (aka Hellery Homosex), and features new material never before published. Ring of Fireis honest, engaging, and ahead of its time.
Through black and white ink drawings, comics, linoleum block print portraits, essays, interviews and erotica, this collection explores the intersections of art, bodies, healthcare, ability, gender, race, community, class, healing and the politics of work.
Alternately emotional and erotic, funny and political, Ring of Fire tells the author’s personal story, and captures the work and words of various artists and leaders from disability culture and history. A young activist steeped in the cultures of queer and punk, Russian embraced a cultural identity of disability while writing Ring of Fire. Years later, Russian examines what it means to work in healthcare in the United States.
This is a BIG book, at 8’x10’ and 237 pages!!!

Celebrate the release of The Ring of Fire Anthology at CSC with author ET Russian, Nomy Lamm, Lyric Seal, and BED DEATH!!!

—————

Left Bank Books says:

The Ring of Fire Anthology is a collection of the zine from the late 1990s by ET Russian (aka Hellery Homosex), and features new material never before published. Ring of Fireis honest, engaging, and ahead of its time.

Through black and white ink drawings, comics, linoleum block print portraits, essays, interviews and erotica, this collection explores the intersections of art, bodies, healthcare, ability, gender, race, community, class, healing and the politics of work.

Alternately emotional and erotic, funny and political, Ring of Fire tells the author’s personal story, and captures the work and words of various artists and leaders from disability culture and history. A young activist steeped in the cultures of queer and punk, Russian embraced a cultural identity of disability while writing Ring of Fire. Years later, Russian examines what it means to work in healthcare in the United States.

This is a BIG book, at 8’x10’ and 237 pages!!!

Isn’t this rad? Its the work of awesome zinester ET Russian who’ll be at CSC next Friday celebrating the release of ET’s zine anthology “Ring of Fire.” Check out the book here and the August 8th event here!
See Nomy Lamm, Lyric Seal, ET Russian, and BED DEATH!

Isn’t this rad? Its the work of awesome zinester ET Russian who’ll be at CSC next Friday celebrating the release of ET’s zine anthology “Ring of Fire.” Check out the book here and the August 8th event here!

See Nomy Lamm, Lyric Seal, ET Russian, and BED DEATH!

CSC is so excited to host this amazing event!
Check it out on FB! 

CSC is so excited to host this amazing event!

Check it out on FB

centersexculture:

Images of the Feminist Future: A Panel on Feminist Porn

Saturday, August 9thDoors open: 8pm/ clips start at 8:30pm/ panel from 9pm-11pmCenter for Sex and Culture 1349 Mission StreetSan Francisco, CAJoin your favorite queer and feminist porn stars & producers in a panel discussion about building a feminist future through porn! This event will be hosted by the Center for Sex and Culture, a celebrated San Francisco event space, library and sex culture archive. Featuring: + clips of feminist porn produced here in the Bay Area!+ snacks and drinks!+ scent free, accessible location in SoMa, SF!+ merch tables!Panelists include: Princess Donna of Kink.comTobi Hill-Meyer of Handbasket ProductionsCourtney Trouble of TROUBLEfilms, AND heartthrobs Cinnamon Maxxine and Chelsea PoeTopics will include feminist praxis-in-action, queer world building, the politics of representation, and more. You will not want to miss this!
RSVP here: https://www.facebook.com/events/814055121961370
8pm Doors, 8:30 Clips, 9-11pm Panel. Sliding Scale $12-20


blogged by emilie

centersexculture:

Images of the Feminist Future: A Panel on Feminist Porn
Saturday, August 9th
Doors open: 8pm/ clips start at 8:30pm/ panel from 9pm-11pm

Center for Sex and Culture 
1349 Mission Street
San Francisco, CA

Join your favorite queer and feminist porn stars & producers in a panel discussion about building a feminist future through porn! 
This event will be hosted by the Center for Sex and Culture, a celebrated San Francisco event space, library and sex culture archive. 

Featuring: 
+ clips of feminist porn produced here in the Bay Area!
+ snacks and drinks!
+ scent free, accessible location in SoMa, SF!
+ merch tables!

Panelists include: 
Princess Donna of Kink.com
Tobi Hill-Meyer of Handbasket Productions
Courtney Trouble of TROUBLEfilms, 
AND heartthrobs Cinnamon Maxxine and Chelsea Poe

Topics will include feminist praxis-in-action, queer world building, the politics of representation, and more. You will not want to miss this!
8pm Doors, 8:30 Clips, 9-11pm Panel. Sliding Scale $12-20

blogged by emilie

Disabled Pride/Disabled Pain: Stories of Kink and Disability, a panel discussion

The Center for Sex and Culture is proud to present a panel discussion of disabled folks discussing their experiences with kink. Join a panel of bad-ass disabled folks for story-sharing centered on disabled pride, sex, power, and (even sometimes) pain. 

Saturday August 23rd from 6:00-8:30

Suggested donation of $7-15 sliding scale. Pay what you can and no one turned away for lack of funds!

Panelists include:
Lyric Seal
Carrie Wade
Corey Alexander 

Topics will include 
*coming into a sexual and kinky identity as a disabled person
*relationships between experiences of oppression and kink play 
*Access intimacy in kinky play
AND more!!

Check out our fb event for more info: https://www.facebook.com/events/1436345039980958/?ref_newsfeed_story_type=regular

Accessibility info: While the Center for Sex and Culture is not ADA accessible, there is wheelchair access through the front door and chairs have fit in the bathroom with relative ease. Our automatic door opener sometimes works, so sooner to the event we will update as to whether it is working or not! Please come scent-free (also no smoking outside the door and please be aware of chemicals you may come in contact with throughout the day). 
***We are working on getting an ASL interpreter so as soon as interpretation is confirmed we will update the Facebook!***

Please ask if you have any accessibility concerns or questions!!! xoxo

Center for Sex and Culture 
1349 Mission Street
San Francisco, CA

Doing Your Dirty Work 3 - Opens Friday at CSC - special creature feature-    Tyler Cohen


If you find ink line work sexy, if you find curvy and loose yet controlled line work in vaguely surreal, open-ended narrative drawings sexy– if you can see the rhythm of a hand that knows how to hold a brush and is quite comfortable with her pens, you might just become a fan of Tyler Cohen’s artwork.


Few are truly called to be ink fetishists working on paper. You have to be partly masochistic. There is no undo button. Fuck undo buttons. There is no eraser. You live with your lines. (Ask me how I know.)


The both images are from an ongoing body of drawings entitled the Primazons. Tyler calls herself anthropologist of the Primazons who “have evolved into their own culture and have become multigenerational” (quote is from Tyler’s bio). I see her as a philosophically-based world maker. She began with thoughts on relationships among women. From there it grew into a world of creatures with their own customs, rules (and rule breaking) and palette. It’s a world we can see on the page but if we want to eavesdrop on the Primazons, we must use our own imagination and projection—there is no text. It’s also a world that is evolving, like her and like us. Come have a look and eavesdrop with us this Friday.

for more info on this show and our gallery program: http://www.sexandculture.org/gallery

The paintings and embroidery above is by Emma Rose Laughlin - one of the dozen artists we are thrilled to be exhibiting in CSC’s Doing Your Dirty Work.

Through constructing cute (see the My Pretty Pony dildo motif), very femme artworks, Emma Rose “juxtapos[es] sexually charged subject matter with tender and sentimental means of execution, she hopes to create a conversation that can shed light on some unresolved issues in the portrayal of sexually empowered women in today’s society.” (from her bio. I want to hear more about that though. Hurray for art openings!)

We’ll  be showing a few of her embroidered pieces in DYDW3. You know, that delicate craft for ladies (or so the stereotype goes) —embroidery —that contain portraits of Emma Rose’s favorite porn stars adorned with pearls (hell-oo Money $hots). Tributes? A compliment? Fan art? What else? Come see for yourself:

CSC - 1349 Mission Street, SF
Doing Your Dirty Work 3: Deeper, Closer

August 1 – September 21, 2014

Opening Reception: Friday August 1, 7-10 pm

Closing Reception: Folsom Fair Sunday September 21, 4-7 pm

DYDW3 - closer, deeper, artist - Anna Zusman

The first image is one of 4 pieces by Zusman included in the upcoming show at Center for Sex and Culture. These mixed media drawings soon to at our gallery, are all from the same series exploring “the influence of media on our sex lives.” I love that she is depicting porn makers and people-machine-hybrids featuring today’s tech gadgets with a classical art sensibility.

Looking at some of the earlier work on her website I am especially enamored with her series of mermaid drawings and her way of taking contemporary life and depicting it with (a slightly morbid sense of) humor and a wink to many artists (who go back further than last week at some contemporary museum) who share a love of allegories and breathtaking craftsmanship.

Doing Your Dirty Work 3 - Closer, Deeper opens on Friday, August 1st from 7-10 pm

along with Anna Zusman, it’ll feature art by Bay Area locals Cricket, crissy bell snail, Emma Laughlin, Felicita Norris, gregory farrar scott, James Courtney, Jon Macy, Shayna Why, Shilo McCabe, Tyler Cohen, Win Mixter with Alex Fialho.

Doing Your Dirty Work 3 - closer, deeper

Time to mark your calendars for our next big art show. Here’s a taste of the goodies!

(drawing by Anna Zusman)

CSC - 1349 Mission Street
San Francisco, CA
August 1 – September 21, 2014
Opening Reception: Friday August 1, 7-10 pm
Closing Reception: Folsom Fair Sunday September 21, 4-7 pm

Doing Your Dirty Work 3: Deeper, Closer focuses on work by Bay Area visual artists addressing themes of themes of sexuality, sexual identity, and gender identity in their art. Curated and juried by Jenn Moreno and Dorian Katz, artists were told “please do not censor yourself. Nothing is too perverse!”

(photo by Shilo McCabe)

Doing Your Dirty Work is CSC’s annual group show of contemporary artists. This year’s show, as the title suggests, stays Closer, limiting submissions to Bay Area artists, and goes Deeper, presenting more work by each artist. By limiting the show to a dozen artists, rather than the usual few dozens, we hope to better allow the viewer to get to know each of these brilliant and perverse contributors to sexual culture making. Work ranges from embroidered doilies of porn star Sasha Grey’s face mid money-shot, collages of gay porn and auction house antiques woven together, digital prints of beloved artists lost to the AIDS Crisis in both San Francisco and New York, and racy yet old-fashioned pencil drawings of human-machine hybrids caught ‘in flagrante delicto.’

Join us at the reception to take a deeper, closer look at artworks by: Anna Zusman, Cricket, crissy bell snail, Emma Laughlin, Felicita Norris, gregory farrar scott, James Courtney, Jon Macy, Shayna Why, Shilo McCabe, Tyler Cohen, Win Mixter with Alex Fialho.

(painting by Felicita Norris)

Lovely people!
We’re sending this out to CSC stakeholders because we think it’ll be of interest to those of you who work occasionally or regularly with the Center for Sex & Culture; we’re also sharing this with the public, who are, after all, stakeholders of our beloved San Francisco. It’s an open letter to a SFGate/SF Chronicle reporter in response to the article cited up front; you may want to read it, titled “How SF’s Mid-Mission District Is Transforming.”
Lots of love to you all! —CQ & Robert
Dear J.K. Dineen, & Dear Reporters, Writers, Columnists and friends from the Chron:
As occupants of the 1300 block of Mission Street, a block specifically referenced in your recent article (http://www.sfgate.com/bayarea/article/How-S-F-s-Mid-Mission-district-is-transforming-5626785.php), we think it’s a shame that your research and reportage missed not only our organization but also the historically interesting building we occupy at 1349 Mission Street (San Francisco Planning Department report on its background included below). Furthermore, we are only one of scores of historic buildings, some architecturally notable, and/or community-based organizations which can be found along the mid-Mission corridor you cover in your SFGate article. You are a champion of architecture and preservation, and our organization, the Center for Sex & Culture, includes an archive of history, a library and materials significant to the rich culture of San Francisco. (More about us below.) In fact, our life interests and focus seem to be in the same genre as yours, at least in part. We read with interest about your book Here Tomorrow: Preserving Architecture, Culture, and California’s Golden Dream; but while “Here Tomorrow” sounds to us like a play on the phrase “Here today, gone tomorrow,” we’re afraid that tomorrow, for all the reasons you (largely uncritically) address in your July 17 article, this hidden-in-plain-sight San Francisco neighborhood and its backstory will indeed be gone.
So to catch you (and your business community contacts and sources) up, in our corner of this neighborhood there are two art galleries, a major SF Dept. of Health HIV outreach, an Aikido dojo, a real estate broker, a small tech company, the SEIU Local 250 union office, a place that gives music lessons, numerous other small businesses, a nonprofit that serves sex workers (until recently there were two) and at least one that provides mental health services and support––and notable independent theatre CounterPulse is preparing to move off our block, relocating under pressure of the rent increases brought about by incurious tech giants and business people. They remain incurious because they don’t know we exist. They don’t know we exist because according to your article we are a “pot club” (“There is nothing on our block but pot clubs,” developer Patrick Kennedy [who’s building out the corner of 9th and Mission] is quoted as saying. He must be thinking of the1200 block; that’s where most of them are.) We are erased from public view by your work, which largely quotes those individuals who have long planned (some for decades) to line their pockets by erasing this neighborhood.
Because you are writing about our block, we can offer you an interesting story. CounterPulse is about to move. We are probably going to have to move as well, because of the rate of increase on lease prices in the neighborhood––in our case, it will be 300%––driven by the development and construction boom that is the subject of your article. Small businesses or nonprofits (we are the latter) may manage to grow at a rate of 30% and stay stable, but such a logarithmic earthquake of finance and speculation will certainly cause us to move this organization out of town or shut it down. Want to watch and report in real time what actually happens to a piece of local culture as it is forced out by architectural and business change? You are invited to be one of the witnesses to our potential death (or survival, but elsewhere) in this new market.
More responses generated by your article: To call what this neighborhood is undergoing a “quiet transformation” suggests that reportage didn’t happen via shoe leather: This period of construction is noisy, dirty and disruptive; to those of us who spend our days here, it is anything but quiet. It’s affecting everything from parking to the pattern of the wind. “As Mission Street becomes denser, some question whether the city is paying enough attention to its public realm. The street is clogged with buses - the 14, 14L and SamTrans lines - with little space for cyclists,” you say. Please tell us that you include public transit when you think of the city’s “public realm”! And if you think what’s growing in the mid-Mission neighborhood will shape up to be an “intimate” environment, you probably feel the recently-erected neighborhood that stretches between Mission Bay and the ballpark is intimate too. (We say “recent,” of course, because everything is relative, and we have lived in San Francisco 25 and 40 years respectively).
The stretch of our street described as “pretty god-awful” by your interviewee Eric Tao (describing our former neighbors between 7th and 8th on Mission) nevertheless includes––as does our block and every intervening one, all the way down to 5th Street––longtime residents of housing that was, at least at one time, affordable; small businesses; and community-based organizations. Just as restaurateur Matt “Semmelhack … has to remind other board members that Mission Street exists,” developer Kennedy wants Mission to “establish… its own identity,” but Mission already has one; the “unique character” developers are intending to create already exists, but San Francisco’s always-significant class divide obstructs others from observing it. While the people in this neighborhood need social services (a great article relevant to this is here: http://missionlocal.org/2014/01/sf-once-a-mecca-now-a-mirage/), they are instead getting 3,876 or more new neighbors. All but one of your interviewees reflect the starry-eyed wonder of the business community as it changes the landscape and cultural opportunities for the people who live and work here. Not a single citizen who lives or rents space in the old, extant mid-Mission weighs in.
Erasing and re-writing not only San Francisco, but California itself (via the “six Californias” partition plan), like it’s a computer, repartitioning the city as though it were a hard drive, obliterates the underrepresented above all. (The reason we at CSC maintain a sexuality community archive is because so many other historical organizations do not keep this material––but clearly, sex is only one part of history and culture that has no guarantee of being preserved.) If you’d rather have a historic parallel, let’s consider that in 1906, the earthquake and fire consumed almost everything between the Embarcadero and 9th Street––as have the tech giants and developers, moving all the way down our street to South Van Ness. 
And if none of those notions seem relevant to the article you were assigned to write, if you’re going to going to call out new and significant restaurants, please at least recognize Moya—an extraordinary Ethiopian cafe (www.eatmoya.com) that has supported local arts and culture since the time it opened at 121 9th St in 2012, just across from the large new residential project Mr. Kennedy is developing. I certainly hope he’ll drop some dollars in there when he pops over from Berkeley to survey the new landscape in the 1300 block.
Here’s more about us––and just to make it clear, each of the businesses and nonprofits that surround us could tell its own story as well. Most of them, too, are in danger of being displaced. The Center for Sex & Culture (CSC) is a 501(c)3 non-profit corporation (EIN 91-2153691). CSC provides judgment-free adult sex education programs, cultural events, a library/media archive, and resources to audiences across the sexual and gender spectrum; researches and disseminates factual information; and frames and informs issues of public policy and public health.
During this moment of the financially-forced diaspora of San Francisco artists and organizations, CSC still supports community needs, offers performance/rehearsal/gallery space with ready-for-use technical gear to performers and artists, and welcomes community groups needing meeting space and educators at affordable rates. We notice that many of the people who have historically used our services or attended our events have already moved to Oakland, or beyond. We display the last rainbow flag on the stretch of Mission Street you’re discussing. We have links to organizations like the Institute for Advanced Study of Human Sexuality and San Francisco Sex Information (both originally associated with Glide Memorial Church), as well as many others now-dead and still-extant. 
CSC has worked or is working with the SF LGBT History Archive, Stanford University, SF State University, USF, UC Med Center, UCLA, UC Berkeley, Oxford, Columbia, Harvard and Yale (among many other institutions) to produce both research and lectures. We welcome interns from universities around the US and the globe. In the last few years we have appeared at both the California Academy of Science and the Exploratorium to lecture publicly about sexuality. One of us (Executive Director Dr. Carol Queen) is a former Grand Marshal of LGBT Pride and an internationally-recognized theorist, commentator and cultural sexologist who has authored a dozen books and been widely published in juried journals and compendiums of sex education and history.
CSC also maintains a free publicly available research library of over 7000 books, an archive of erotic materials chronicling the history of safer sex and sex-positive culture in SF, and an art collection (over 400 pieces of framed/flat art and tens of thousands of pieces of photographic, plastic art and ephemera). Conserving this collection is a monumental and expensive task, absorbing a large percentage of space and budget. In 2013 CSC provided archive and library support to The SF Health Department; The University of Vancouver, British Columbia (PhD research); and San Jose State University Library Sciences program (ten MLIS degrees awarded supported by work done at CSC). In 2014 we also provided support to investigators from the SF Public Defenders office.
The Center for Sex & Culture is currently an entrepreneurial effort with a budget of about $100,000 a year. It meets or exceeds this budget each year only because the community continues to demonstrate a need for its support, and supports it in kind. Other granting cycles and funding sources have included The San Francisco Foundation, The Creative Work Fund, The Janus Foundation, The Cloudview Foundation, Craigslist Foundation, SF Pride, The Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence, Inc., The Horizons Foundation, The Cumulus Fund, The American Endowment Fund Special Master of The Superior Court of San Francisco Judge Isabella Grant, and the City of San Francisco Arts Commission.
Thanks for listening to our point of view. We’ve cc’ed some of the writers at the Chronicle/SFGate who we think will find our perspective relevant or who have covered Center for Sex & Culture events or issues in the past. We’re also issuing this as an open letter to our membership and stakeholders. We can be contacted at mail@sexandculture.org should you (or any of those we’ve cc’ed) want to get in touch.
—Drs. Robert Morgan Lawrence and Carol Queen
Founders, Center for Sex & Culture
A 501(c)3 Educational non-profit
PS––
As a preser-vationist, we think you’ll find this information about 1349 Mission of interest:     
"In regard to California Register Criterion 1 (History/ Events) this property is considered under both the Industrial Employment context and 1906 Earthquake and Fire Reconstruction context of the Historic Context Statement, Market & Octavia Neighborhood Plan Area, since it is both an identified building type (commercial/light industrial) and dates from the Period of Significance (1890-1956 and 1906-1929) of that context. There is no indication the property is eligible for listing in the California Register under Criterion 2 (Important Persons), Criterion 3 (Design/Construction), or Criterion 4 (Information Potential). Criterion 1: 1349 Mission Street was constructed between 1906 and 1913 on land that was formerly occupied by a two-and-a-half-story, wood-frame dwelling which sat back from the street on a large lot. The lot and the dwelling were owned and occupied by the Parent family. The Parents owned this lot as early as 1894, and continued ownership through at least 1909. At the time of the earthquake, the lot was owned by the insurance broker named Charles Parmalee. In 1909, ownership of the lot changed hands, being purchased by a machinist named Ira V. Scholfield. In 1910, the lot was occupied by Weiler Brothers Stables, likely an interim use erected on the site after the disaster. The 1913 Sanborn describes the building at this lot as a two-story safe manufacturer, which the City Directory reveals to be C. J. Periam & Co. Safe Manufacturers and Dealers. In 1932, Scholfield sold the lot to William W. Hansen, who appears to have instigated the facade changes that now characterize the building. In 1940, the building was occupied by the United Service Co., a carpet cleaning company. … The 1906 Earthquake and resultant fire leveled the entire South of Market area. Reconstruction of the South of Market Area proceeded in several distinct periods, beginning with an initial flurry of activity between 1906 and 1913, a later wave occurring after the First World War between 1918 and 1920, and then a large boom in the mid-to-late 1920s. Often residential and smaller commercial and industrial rebuilding preceded large scale industrial rebuilding due to necessity, relative ease of construction, and less difficulty settling insurance claims. Industrial buildings, mostly used for warehousing, light manufacturing, or auto repair, were typically built along major arterial streets with storefronts and vehicular and pedestrian entrances facing the street. Many industrial buildings also featured secondary entrances and loading docks on secondary elevations, in particular those that back on to alleys or driveways. From the beginning of the Gold Rush through at least the 1950s, San Francisco was a regional center for industrial employment, and large numbers of San Franciscans made their livings in these fields. One early San Francisco industry was metalworking, including the production of machinery for mining, railroad, and regional agricultural needs. As a busy mercantile center, warehousing and distribution were all important. Food processing, clothing manufacturing, furniture making, and many other industries were developed to supply the rapidly growing populations of California and other western states, for which San Francisco was the metropolis well into the twentieth century. Metalworking, which the C. J. Periam & Co. Safe Manufacturers and Dealers operation would have participated in, was an important industrial employer in San Francisco. Twenty-four machine shops, machinery manufacturers, or machinery distributors did business in the subject area during the Period of Significance. In 1909, such places employed 3,400 workers citywide, and added $4.7 million to the economy. By 1954, despite increasing automation, they still employed slightly over 3,000, and contributed $23.7 million to the city’s economy. 969 Natoma Street, with its building typology and known association with industrial employment, clearly demonstrates an association with this broad pattern of San Francisco history." (c) 2011 San Francisco Planning Department
NB: As an additional note it appears that some of the original framing (charred in place) still remains and the entire structure is clad in inch thick non-dimensional redwood. It is a heavy timber building - as such, kind of scarce.

Lovely people!

We’re sending this out to CSC stakeholders because we think it’ll be of interest to those of you who work occasionally or regularly with the Center for Sex & Culture; we’re also sharing this with the public, who are, after all, stakeholders of our beloved San Francisco. It’s an open letter to a SFGate/SF Chronicle reporter in response to the article cited up front; you may want to read it, titled “How SF’s Mid-Mission District Is Transforming.”

Lots of love to you all! —CQ & Robert

Dear J.K. Dineen, & Dear Reporters, Writers, Columnists and friends from the Chron:

As occupants of the 1300 block of Mission Street, a block specifically referenced in your recent article (http://www.sfgate.com/bayarea/article/How-S-F-s-Mid-Mission-district-is-transforming-5626785.php), we think it’s a shame that your research and reportage missed not only our organization but also the historically interesting building we occupy at 1349 Mission Street (San Francisco Planning Department report on its background included below). Furthermore, we are only one of scores of historic buildings, some architecturally notable, and/or community-based organizations which can be found along the mid-Mission corridor you cover in your SFGate article. You are a champion of architecture and preservation, and our organization, the Center for Sex & Culture, includes an archive of history, a library and materials significant to the rich culture of San Francisco. (More about us below.) In fact, our life interests and focus seem to be in the same genre as yours, at least in part. We read with interest about your book Here Tomorrow: Preserving Architecture, Culture, and California’s Golden Dream; but while “Here Tomorrow” sounds to us like a play on the phrase “Here today, gone tomorrow,” we’re afraid that tomorrow, for all the reasons you (largely uncritically) address in your July 17 article, this hidden-in-plain-sight San Francisco neighborhood and its backstory will indeed be gone.

So to catch you (and your business community contacts and sources) up, in our corner of this neighborhood there are two art galleries, a major SF Dept. of Health HIV outreach, an Aikido dojo, a real estate broker, a small tech company, the SEIU Local 250 union office, a place that gives music lessons, numerous other small businesses, a nonprofit that serves sex workers (until recently there were two) and at least one that provides mental health services and support––and notable independent theatre CounterPulse is preparing to move off our block, relocating under pressure of the rent increases brought about by incurious tech giants and business people. They remain incurious because they don’t know we exist. They don’t know we exist because according to your article we are a “pot club” (“There is nothing on our block but pot clubs,” developer Patrick Kennedy [who’s building out the corner of 9th and Mission] is quoted as saying. He must be thinking of the1200 block; that’s where most of them are.) We are erased from public view by your work, which largely quotes those individuals who have long planned (some for decades) to line their pockets by erasing this neighborhood.

Because you are writing about our block, we can offer you an interesting story. CounterPulse is about to move. We are probably going to have to move as well, because of the rate of increase on lease prices in the neighborhood––in our case, it will be 300%––driven by the development and construction boom that is the subject of your article. Small businesses or nonprofits (we are the latter) may manage to grow at a rate of 30% and stay stable, but such a logarithmic earthquake of finance and speculation will certainly cause us to move this organization out of town or shut it down. Want to watch and report in real time what actually happens to a piece of local culture as it is forced out by architectural and business change? You are invited to be one of the witnesses to our potential death (or survival, but elsewhere) in this new market.

More responses generated by your article: To call what this neighborhood is undergoing a “quiet transformation” suggests that reportage didn’t happen via shoe leather: This period of construction is noisy, dirty and disruptive; to those of us who spend our days here, it is anything but quiet. It’s affecting everything from parking to the pattern of the wind. “As Mission Street becomes denser, some question whether the city is paying enough attention to its public realm. The street is clogged with buses - the 14, 14L and SamTrans lines - with little space for cyclists,” you say. Please tell us that you include public transit when you think of the city’s “public realm”! And if you think what’s growing in the mid-Mission neighborhood will shape up to be an “intimate” environment, you probably feel the recently-erected neighborhood that stretches between Mission Bay and the ballpark is intimate too. (We say “recent,” of course, because everything is relative, and we have lived in San Francisco 25 and 40 years respectively).

The stretch of our street described as “pretty god-awful” by your interviewee Eric Tao (describing our former neighbors between 7th and 8th on Mission) nevertheless includes––as does our block and every intervening one, all the way down to 5th Street––longtime residents of housing that was, at least at one time, affordable; small businesses; and community-based organizations. Just as restaurateur Matt “Semmelhack … has to remind other board members that Mission Street exists,” developer Kennedy wants Mission to “establish… its own identity,” but Mission already has one; the “unique character” developers are intending to create already exists, but San Francisco’s always-significant class divide obstructs others from observing it. While the people in this neighborhood need social services (a great article relevant to this is here: http://missionlocal.org/2014/01/sf-once-a-mecca-now-a-mirage/), they are instead getting 3,876 or more new neighbors. All but one of your interviewees reflect the starry-eyed wonder of the business community as it changes the landscape and cultural opportunities for the people who live and work here. Not a single citizen who lives or rents space in the old, extant mid-Mission weighs in.

Erasing and re-writing not only San Francisco, but California itself (via the “six Californias” partition plan), like it’s a computer, repartitioning the city as though it were a hard drive, obliterates the underrepresented above all. (The reason we at CSC maintain a sexuality community archive is because so many other historical organizations do not keep this material––but clearly, sex is only one part of history and culture that has no guarantee of being preserved.) If you’d rather have a historic parallel, let’s consider that in 1906, the earthquake and fire consumed almost everything between the Embarcadero and 9th Street––as have the tech giants and developers, moving all the way down our street to South Van Ness. 

And if none of those notions seem relevant to the article you were assigned to write, if you’re going to going to call out new and significant restaurants, please at least recognize Moya—an extraordinary Ethiopian cafe (www.eatmoya.com) that has supported local arts and culture since the time it opened at 121 9th St in 2012, just across from the large new residential project Mr. Kennedy is developing. I certainly hope he’ll drop some dollars in there when he pops over from Berkeley to survey the new landscape in the 1300 block.

Here’s more about us––and just to make it clear, each of the businesses and nonprofits that surround us could tell its own story as well. Most of them, too, are in danger of being displaced. The Center for Sex & Culture (CSC) is a 501(c)3 non-profit corporation (EIN 91-2153691). CSC provides judgment-free adult sex education programs, cultural events, a library/media archive, and resources to audiences across the sexual and gender spectrum; researches and disseminates factual information; and frames and informs issues of public policy and public health.

During this moment of the financially-forced diaspora of San Francisco artists and organizations, CSC still supports community needs, offers performance/rehearsal/gallery space with ready-for-use technical gear to performers and artists, and welcomes community groups needing meeting space and educators at affordable rates. We notice that many of the people who have historically used our services or attended our events have already moved to Oakland, or beyond. We display the last rainbow flag on the stretch of Mission Street you’re discussing. We have links to organizations like the Institute for Advanced Study of Human Sexuality and San Francisco Sex Information (both originally associated with Glide Memorial Church), as well as many others now-dead and still-extant. 

CSC has worked or is working with the SF LGBT History Archive, Stanford University, SF State University, USF, UC Med Center, UCLA, UC Berkeley, Oxford, Columbia, Harvard and Yale (among many other institutions) to produce both research and lectures. We welcome interns from universities around the US and the globe. In the last few years we have appeared at both the California Academy of Science and the Exploratorium to lecture publicly about sexuality. One of us (Executive Director Dr. Carol Queen) is a former Grand Marshal of LGBT Pride and an internationally-recognized theorist, commentator and cultural sexologist who has authored a dozen books and been widely published in juried journals and compendiums of sex education and history.

CSC also maintains a free publicly available research library of over 7000 books, an archive of erotic materials chronicling the history of safer sex and sex-positive culture in SF, and an art collection (over 400 pieces of framed/flat art and tens of thousands of pieces of photographic, plastic art and ephemera). Conserving this collection is a monumental and expensive task, absorbing a large percentage of space and budget. In 2013 CSC provided archive and library support to The SF Health Department; The University of Vancouver, British Columbia (PhD research); and San Jose State University Library Sciences program (ten MLIS degrees awarded supported by work done at CSC). In 2014 we also provided support to investigators from the SF Public Defenders office.

The Center for Sex & Culture is currently an entrepreneurial effort with a budget of about $100,000 a year. It meets or exceeds this budget each year only because the community continues to demonstrate a need for its support, and supports it in kind. Other granting cycles and funding sources have included The San Francisco Foundation, The Creative Work Fund, The Janus Foundation, The Cloudview Foundation, Craigslist Foundation, SF Pride, The Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence, Inc., The Horizons Foundation, The Cumulus Fund, The American Endowment Fund Special Master of The Superior Court of San Francisco Judge Isabella Grant, and the City of San Francisco Arts Commission.

Thanks for listening to our point of view. We’ve cc’ed some of the writers at the Chronicle/SFGate who we think will find our perspective relevant or who have covered Center for Sex & Culture events or issues in the past. We’re also issuing this as an open letter to our membership and stakeholders. We can be contacted at mail@sexandculture.org should you (or any of those we’ve cc’ed) want to get in touch.

—Drs. Robert Morgan Lawrence and Carol Queen

Founders, Center for Sex & Culture

A 501(c)3 Educational non-profit

PS––

As a preser-vationist, we think you’ll find this information about 1349 Mission of interest:     

"In regard to California Register Criterion 1 (History/ Events) this property is considered under both the Industrial Employment context and 1906 Earthquake and Fire Reconstruction context of the Historic Context Statement, Market & Octavia Neighborhood Plan Area, since it is both an identified building type (commercial/light industrial) and dates from the Period of Significance (1890-1956 and 1906-1929) of that context. There is no indication the property is eligible for listing in the California Register under Criterion 2 (Important Persons), Criterion 3 (Design/Construction), or Criterion 4 (Information Potential). Criterion 1: 1349 Mission Street was constructed between 1906 and 1913 on land that was formerly occupied by a two-and-a-half-story, wood-frame dwelling which sat back from the street on a large lot. The lot and the dwelling were owned and occupied by the Parent family. The Parents owned this lot as early as 1894, and continued ownership through at least 1909. At the time of the earthquake, the lot was owned by the insurance broker named Charles Parmalee. In 1909, ownership of the lot changed hands, being purchased by a machinist named Ira V. Scholfield. In 1910, the lot was occupied by Weiler Brothers Stables, likely an interim use erected on the site after the disaster. The 1913 Sanborn describes the building at this lot as a two-story safe manufacturer, which the City Directory reveals to be C. J. Periam & Co. Safe Manufacturers and Dealers. In 1932, Scholfield sold the lot to William W. Hansen, who appears to have instigated the facade changes that now characterize the building. In 1940, the building was occupied by the United Service Co., a carpet cleaning company. … The 1906 Earthquake and resultant fire leveled the entire South of Market area. Reconstruction of the South of Market Area proceeded in several distinct periods, beginning with an initial flurry of activity between 1906 and 1913, a later wave occurring after the First World War between 1918 and 1920, and then a large boom in the mid-to-late 1920s. Often residential and smaller commercial and industrial rebuilding preceded large scale industrial rebuilding due to necessity, relative ease of construction, and less difficulty settling insurance claims. Industrial buildings, mostly used for warehousing, light manufacturing, or auto repair, were typically built along major arterial streets with storefronts and vehicular and pedestrian entrances facing the street. Many industrial buildings also featured secondary entrances and loading docks on secondary elevations, in particular those that back on to alleys or driveways. From the beginning of the Gold Rush through at least the 1950s, San Francisco was a regional center for industrial employment, and large numbers of San Franciscans made their livings in these fields. One early San Francisco industry was metalworking, including the production of machinery for mining, railroad, and regional agricultural needs. As a busy mercantile center, warehousing and distribution were all important. Food processing, clothing manufacturing, furniture making, and many other industries were developed to supply the rapidly growing populations of California and other western states, for which San Francisco was the metropolis well into the twentieth century. Metalworking, which the C. J. Periam & Co. Safe Manufacturers and Dealers operation would have participated in, was an important industrial employer in San Francisco. Twenty-four machine shops, machinery manufacturers, or machinery distributors did business in the subject area during the Period of Significance. In 1909, such places employed 3,400 workers citywide, and added $4.7 million to the economy. By 1954, despite increasing automation, they still employed slightly over 3,000, and contributed $23.7 million to the city’s economy. 969 Natoma Street, with its building typology and known association with industrial employment, clearly demonstrates an association with this broad pattern of San Francisco history." (c) 2011 San Francisco Planning Department

NB: As an additional note it appears that some of the original framing (charred in place) still remains and the entire structure is clad in inch thick non-dimensional redwood. It is a heavy timber building - as such, kind of scarce.

Agent Agnes will be in the house on Sunday peddling her wares and greeting the lovely smut aficionados.

She’s been drawing for some awesome projects lately

Come see for yourself at Bookish Beast this Sunday.

Laurel Lee: Bookish Beast Contributor!

Bookish Beasts is almost here, and we’ve got another rad artist for you. Meet Laurel Lee! 

Laurel Lee is a visual artist who, for the first time, will be sharing handmade books. Laurel’s work can be found via Laurel’sArt on Facebook. 
As you know by now, the lineup is truly awesome— so keep spreading the word! AND keep a look out for these awesome bookmarks around town:

See ya there on sunday ;)
Blogged by emilie 

The prolific Shayna Why is bringing her goods to Bookish Beasts this Sunday.  In addition to making comics, Ms. Why paints, draws, makes scary soft dolls (depending on what you’re afraid of), silkscreens on fabric panties and dresses, constructs dollhouses and just self-published an anthology of her artist and writer friends.

Check out her work  http://www.shaynawhy.com/and you’ll be as excited as the CSC staff to see her latest projects.

Bookish Beasts — Sunday, July 13 — noon to 6 pm 1349 Mission Street SF (the one and only Center for Sex and Culture)

CCA’s MFA in Comics Program at Bookish Beasts

CCA is one of the few universities with a comics making program. Lucky for us they are in our fair city and bringing goods from their professors, students and alum to the party on the 13th.

They’ve also got a Facebook page

We love you local comics scholars and can’t wait to see the goodies you bring to the fest!

(image below by artist and CCA professor, Justin Hall)

Loading more posts

About

The Center for Sex and Culture provides a judgment-free education, cultural events, a library/media archive, and other resources to audiences across the sexual and gender spectrum. From our San Francisco home we promote creativity, information and healthy sexual knowledge.

Current CSC bloggers: Marilyn Roxie, Miss Andry, MissIan, and Shayna Sparling

Subscribe via RSS

Twitter Facebook
FetLife Kotango       

Blog posts are curated by Center for Sex and Culture interns and staff members, including event reminders, news about events at other organizations, and media content curated from other Tumblr sites with source attribution when available. If you would like to contact us about content removal, please e-mail socialmedia@sexandculture.org.

Home
Contact
Internships
Accessibility
Online Bookstore
Vintage Mags for Sale
Alibris & Amazon Wishlists
Masturbate-A-Thon
Grace Alley Mural
Zineography
Sexology Journals Database
Zine Catalog
Bookish Beasts


Ask me anything Submit

Ask